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Other Forensics Standards Other forensic standards, here grouped to introduce a sample of the range of forensic inquiry, delve into topics set as broadly apart as forensic dental data sets and forensic paint analysis and comparison. The development of standardized procedures and formats for such a wide range of potential tests and data types lends credibility to the field of forensic inquiry as a whole, with each additional standard supporting the already existing pool. Furthermore, other related standards, such as those for land search, address the collection of forensic evidence before it even reaches a laboratory.

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ANSI/ADA 1058-2010 (R2015)

Forensic Dental Data Set

The purpose of this standard is to develop uniform nomenclature for the description of forensic dental data and define a standardized set of uniform terms to convey this information. The goal of the standard is not to define the extent of information collected, only to be certain that common terms are used in order to aid in an identifying human remains or a living amnesiac.


ASTM E1413-13

Standard Practice for Separation of Ignitable Liquid Residues from Fire Debris Samples by Dynamic Headspace Concentration

1.1 This practice describes the procedure for separation of small quantities of ignitable liquid residues from fire debris samples using the method of dynamic headspace concentration. 1.2 Dynamic headspace concentration uses adsorption and subsequent solvent elution or thermal desorption. 1.3 Both positive and negative pressure systems for adsorption are described, as well as a thermal desorption system. 1.4 While this practice is suitable for successfully extracting ignitable liquid residues over the entire range of concentration, the headspace concentration methods are best used when a high level of sensitivity is required due to a very low concentration of ignitable liquid residues in the sample. 1.5 Alternate separation and concentration procedures are listed in Section 2 . If archival of the extract is of importance, then this practice s thermal desorption procedure, SPME (Practice E2154), and headspace (Practice E1388) sample separation techniques are not recommended unless a portion of the extract can be split and retained. In order to have an archivable extract, then this practice s sample collection on charcoal, solvent extraction (Practice E1386), or passive headspace concentration (Practice E1412) is recommended. 1.6 This practice offers a set of instructions for performing one or more specific operations. This standard cannot replace knowledge, skill, or ability acquired through appropriate education, training, and experience and should be used in conjunction with sound professional judgment. 1.7 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM D874-13a

Standard Test Method for Sulfated Ash from Lubricating Oils and Additives

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the sulfated ash from unused lubricating oils containing additives and from additive concentrates used in compounding. These additives usually contain one or more of the following metals: barium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, potassium, sodium, and tin. The elements sulfur, phosphorus, and chlorine can also be present in combined form. 1.2 Application of this test method to sulfated ash levels below 0.02 mass % is restricted to oils containing ashless additives. The lower limit of the test method is 0.005 mass % sulfated ash. Note 1 This test method is not intended for the analysis of used engine oils or oils containing lead. Neither is it recommended for the analysis of nonadditive lubricating oils, for which Test Method D482 can be used. Note 2 There is evidence that magnesium does not react the same as other alkali metals in this test. If magnesium additives are present, the data is interpreted with caution. Note 3 There is evidence that samples containing molybdenum can give low results because molybdenum compounds are not fully recovered at the temperature of ashing. 1.3 Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) conforming to EN 14213 and EN 14214, when tested using this test method, were shown to meet its precision. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM E1588-17

Standard Practice for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry

1.1 This practice covers the analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) using manual and automated methods. The analysis may be performed manually, with the operator manipulating the microscope controls and the EDS system software, or in an automated fashion, where some amount of the analysis is controlled by pre-set software functions. This practice refers to the analysis of electron microscopy stubs and does not address sample collection ( 1 ) . 2 1.2 Since software and hardware formats vary among commercial systems, guidelines will be offered in the most general terms possible. For proper terminology and operation, consult the SEM/EDS system manuals for each instrument. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This practice offers a set of instructions for performing one or more specific operations. This practice cannot replace knowledge, skill, or ability acquired through appropriate education, training, and experience and should be used in conjunction with sound professional judgment. 1.5 This practice does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user when applying this practice to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM E1610-14

Standard Guide for Forensic Paint Analysis and Comparison

1.1 Forensic paint analyses and comparisons are typically distinguished by sample size that precludes the application of many standard industrial paint analysis procedures or protocols. The forensic paint examiner must address concerns such as the issues of a case or investigation, sample size, complexity and condition, environmental effects, and collection methods. These factors require that the forensic paint examiner choose test methods, sample preparation schemes, test sequence, and degree of sample alteration and consumption that are suitable to each specific case. 1.2 This guide is intended as an introduction to standard guides for forensic examination of paints and coatings. It is intended to assist individuals who conduct forensic paint analyses in their evaluation, selection, and application of tests that may be of value to their investigations. This guide describes methods to develop discriminatory information using an efficient and reasonable order of testing. The need for validated methods and quality assurance guidelines is also addressed. This document is not intended as a detailed methods description or rigid scheme for the analysis and comparison of paints, but as a guide to the strengths and limitations of each analytical method. The goal is to provide a consistent approach to forensic paint analysis. 1.3 This guide cannot replace knowledge, skill, or ability acquired through appropriate education, training, and experience and should be used in conjunction with sound professional judgment. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 Some of the methods discussed in this guide involve the use of dangerous chemicals, temperatures, and radiation sources. This guide does not purport to address the possible safety hazards or precautions associated with its application. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.


ASTM E1967-11a

Standard Test Method for the Automated Determination of Refractive Index of Glass Samples Using the Oil Immersion Method and a Phase Contrast Microscope

1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measuring the refractive index ( t ) of glass samples, irregularly shaped and as small as 300 g, for the comparison of fragments of a known source to recovered fragments from a questioned source. 1.2 This test method does not include the measurement of optical dispersion or the measurement of refractive index ( t ) at any other wavelength other than the Sodium D line ( D t ). This method employs a narrow band pass filter at 589 nm, but other filters could be employed using the described method and allowing the t to be determined at other wavelengths, therefore, also allowing for the dispersion value to be calculated. 1.3 Alternative methods for the determination of t are listed in Refs ( 1-5 ). 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard test method does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM E2292-14

Standard Guide for Field Investigation of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Incidents

1.1 This guide covers collection and preservation of information and physical evidence related to incidents involving the poisoning of individuals by carbon monoxide. 1.2 This guide is not intended to address the medical effects of carbon monoxide exposure. 1.3 This guide is not intended to be a guide for investigating carbon monoxide poisoning caused by hostile fires, or contamination in closed air systems or confined spaces. Guidance on the investigation of carbon monoxide poisonings related to fire can be found in NFPA 921. 1.4 This guide is not intended for an investigation where equipment is removed from the incident site and conducted in a more controlled setting. 1.5 This guide is intended to be used by a wide range of investigators, including first responders, appliance technicians and engineers. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM E2713-11

Standard Guide to Forensic Engineering

1.1 This guide provides an introductory reference to the professional practice of forensic engineering, and discusses the typical roles and qualifications of practitioners.


ASTM E2808-11

Standard Guide for Microspectrophotometry and Color Measurement in Forensic Paint Analysis

1.1 This guide is intended to assist individuals and laboratories that conduct forensic visible and ultraviolet (UV) spectral analyses on small fragments of paint using Guide E1610 . 1.2 This guide deals primarily with color measurements within the visible spectral range but will also include some details concerning measurements in the UV range. 1.3 This guide does not address other areas of color evaluation such as paint surface texture or paint pigment particle size, shape, or dispersion within a paint film that are evaluated by other forms of microscopy. Other techniques such as spectral luminescence, fluorescence, and near infrared (NIR) are not included in this guide because of their limited use, lack of validation, or established efficacy in forensic paint analysis. 1.4 This guide is directed at the color analysis of commercially prepared paints and coatings. It does not address the analysis or determination of provenance of artistic, historical, or restorative paints, but it may be found useful in those fields. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM F1633-97(2008)

Standard Guide for Techniques in Land Search

1.1 This guide identifies and describes techniques that may be used by individuals or agencies when searching for persons, property, or evidence on land. The application of one or more of these techniques to any particular land search will depend upon the individual circumstances of the search and the judgment of the person responsible for conducting the search. 1.2 This guide assists individuals and agencies by providing a list of techniques for their consideration during a land search and by providing a brief description of the application of the technique to land search. Some advantages and disadvantages, as well as the most common uses of the techniques, are discussed in the guide. The guide does not, however, purport to discuss all aspects of conducting a land search. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM F2209-14

Standard Guide for Training of Land Search Team Member

1.1 This guide establishes the minimum training requirements for land search personnel as it relates to their general, field, and search specific knowledge and skills. 1.2 A Land Search Team Member searches on the surface of the land only, including urban or disaster areas that may be isolated or have lost supporting infrastructure. 1.3 This guide does not provide the minimum training requirements for searching in partially or fully collapsed structures, in or on water, in confined spaces, or underground (such as caves, mines, and tunnels.) 1.4 Personnel trained to this guide are not qualified to perform rescue. No knots, rope, high angle or low angle litter, or other rescue skills are required of a Land Search Team Member. 1.5 Personnel trained to this guide are not qualified to operate in leadership positions. 1.6 Land Search Team Members are eligible to be members of Type II search teams or crews as defined in Classification F1993 . 1.7 Further training may be required before a Land Search Team Member can participate on a particular Kind of search team, depending on local needs, regulations, or policies of the authority having jurisdiction. 1.8 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.


CGA TB-8

Evidence of Ownership of Compressed Gas Cylinders

NONE


ISO/TR 15599:2002

Digital codification of dental laboratory procedures

ISO/TR 15599:2002 provides a code of dental laboratory procedures which is digital so as to render it language-independent. This makes it convenient to use as a basic reference for existing or future dental codes, and ensures their compatibility through simple softwares, which is the fundamental goal of the exercise. In addition the digital code is intended to provide, as a result of built-in indexing functions: the identification and traceability of dental prostheses and materials, epidemiology and forensic dentistry, investment planning, teaching, research, industry, insurance systems, social services and regulatory authorities; the creation of performing databases for the field evaluation of materials, design and construction techniques of dental prostheses, and their effects, wanted or unwanted; the possibility of communication between the dental professions, dental industry and trade, on both qualitative and quantitative scales.