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Product Design Standards Product design standards address the design and production of products intended for a wide range of ordinary consumers from the public at large. Unlike safety standards intended for workers who might be expected to receive training prior to using equipment, these standards address safety and comfort concerns for the public, such as playground equipment and furniture for children or considerations such as ergonomics for a wide array of industries, environments, and products.

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ASTM Medical Device Standards

ASTM Medical Device Standards

ASTM is one of the leading standards developers for medical devices. With 24 categories, addressing everything from surgical implements to automated analysis, ASTM medical device standards cover a truly wide range. With how much research and training goes into the medical industry, standardization plays a key role in productively actualizing that effort. Organized below for your convenience by usage, industry, and theme are over 300 standards.


BSI Child Care and Safety Standards

BSI Child Care and Safety Standards

BSI Child Care and Safety standards cover a range of products to be used by children and by adults caring for children. Published by the British Standards Institution, many of these standards are for products such as carriers, cradles, cots, and other devices designed for holding a child. Other standards address products like cutlery or toys, where the child itself is handling the product. Looking outside of the home, playground equipment and surfacing is a key focus in child safety standards efforts, along with foodstuffs, and personal flotation devices designed for use with children.


Consumer Products Safety Standards

Consumer Products Safety Standards

Consumer products safety standards are necessary for the testing and evaluation of a wide variety of consumer products. ASTM International (ASTM) has developed consumer products safety standards for an assortment of products such as playground equipment, swimming pools and spas, baby cribs, soccer goals, chairs, candles, toddler beds, children’s toys, toddler carriers, trampolines, and more. These standards serve as a guideline for manufacturers to use for the assurance of quality and safety.

There are several consumer safety groups that assist in educating consumers about product safety, including the Consumer Federation of America (CFA), Kids in Danger (KID), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Their goal is to educate consumers about potential health risks that are associated with the use of thousands of products constantly used in our daily lives.

These groups work closely with many others in order to assure the implementation of mandatory standards that were determined by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (PDF link). For example: Congress mandated that the ASTM F963 Consumer Safety Specification for Toy Safety, become a mandatory standard for the improvement of toy safety.


Ergonomics Standards

Ergonomics Standards

Ergonomics standards in the workplace promote worker productivity, safety and health. The standards outline practices for improving accessibility, and visibility. They provide standardized procedures and practices for measuring and reducing physical stress and mental fatigue from motion, vibration, shock, sounds. Representative standards for ergonomics are shown below. Several hundred ergonomics standards may be found by keyword or document number search. The main categories for ergonomic standards cover a wide range of specialties:


Household Appliances

Household Appliances

Household appliance standards, developed by multiple standard developing organizations with a particular focus from IEC, look to the safety of appliances that are intended for household or light industrial use and may be handled by consumers, children, or others who may be unskilled. Combining the power involved in many of these appliances and the safety of the user is a complicated issue that feeds strongly into the need for standardization.