Customer Service:
Mon - Fri: 8:30 am - 6 pm EST

ASTM International

ASTM International, founded as the American Society for Testing and Materials, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes approximately 12,000 technical standards, covering the procedures for testing and classification of materials of every sort. Headquartered in West Conshohocken, United States, ASTM standards are used worldwide, with its membership consisting of over 30,000 members representing 135 countries. ASTM also serves as the administrator for the U.S. TAGs (United States Technical Advisory Group) to an enormous amount of ISO/TCs (International Organization for Standardization/Technical Committee) and to their subcommittees. Standards from ASTM are available both individually, directly through the ANSI webstore, and as part of a Standards Subscription. If you or your organization are interested in easy, managed, online access to standards that can be shared, a Standards Subscription may be what you need - please contact us at: StandardsSubscriptions@ansi.org or 1-212-642-4980 or Request Proposal Price.

Below are ASTM's best-selling standards. To find additional standards, please use the search bar above.

 Back to All Publishers Home

ASTM D4169-16

Standard Practice for Performance Testing of Shipping Containers and Systems

1.1 This practice provides a uniform basis of evaluating, in a laboratory, the ability of shipping units to withstand the distribution environment. This is accomplished by subjecting them to a test plan consisting of a sequence of anticipated hazard elements encountered in various distribution cycles. This practice is not intended to supplant material specifications or existing preshipment test procedures.

1.2 Consider the use of Practice D7386 for testing of packages for single parcel shipments.

1.3 The suitability of this practice for use with hazardous materials has not been determined.

1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard.

1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM F2100-20

Standard Specification for Performance of Materials Used in Medical Face Masks

1.1 This specification covers testing and requirements for materials used in the construction of medical face masks that are used in providing healthcare services such as surgery and patient care. 1.1.1 This specification addresses medical masks with ties (surgical masks) and ear loops (procedure masks or isolation masks). 1.2 This specification provides for the classification of medical face mask material performance. Medical face mask material performance is based on testing for bacterial filtration efficiency, differential pressure, sub-micron particulate filtration efficiency, resistance to penetration by synthetic blood, and flammability. 1.3 This specification does not address all aspects of medical face mask design and performance. This specification does not specifically evaluate the effectiveness of medical face mask designs as related to their overall barrier and breathability properties. 1.3.1 This specification does not include any specific design criteria for medical face masks; however, surgical masks are differentiated by having ties to allow adjustment of the medical face mask fit in comparison to procedure or isolation masks, which use ear loops to affix the mask to the wearerâ's face. 1.4 This specification does not address requirements for regulated respiratory protection devices such as respirators, which may be necessary for some healthcare services and exposure to inhalation hazards. Note 1: Performance requirements for NIOSH-approved N95 respirators are described in 42 CFR Part 84. Additional requirements for NIOSH-approved N95 respirators intended for use in healthcare settings are described in the Memorandum of Understanding between FDA and NIOSH. FDA/NIOSH MOU 225-18-006, November 2017 and the NIOSH Conformity Assessment Letter to Manufacturers, NIOSH CA 2018-1010, November 2018. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 The following precautionary caveat pertains only to the test methods portion, Section 9 , of this specification: This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety, health, and environmental practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.7 This international standard was developed in accordance with internationally recognized principles on standardization established in the Decision on Principles for the Development of International Standards, Guides and Recommendations issued by the World Trade Organization Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee.


ASTM E2018-15

Standard Guide for Property Condition Assessments: Baseline Property Condition Assessment Process

1.1 Purpose—The purpose of this guide is to define good commercial practice in the United States of America for conducting a baseline property condition assessment (PCA) of the improvements located on a parcel of commercial real estate by performing a walk-through survey and conducting research as outlined within this guide.

1.2 Objectives—Objectives in the development of this guide are to:...

1.3 Considerations Beyond Scope—The use of this guide is strictly limited to the scope set forth in this section. Section 11 and Appendix X1 of this guide identify, for informational purposes, certain physical conditions that may exist on the subject property, and certain activities or procedures (not an all inclusive list) that are beyond the scope of this guide but may warrant consideration by parties to a commercial real estate transaction to enhance the PCA.


ASTM F3194-16

Standard Guide for Training for Personnel Operating Small Land Off Road Vehicles (ATV-ROHV Ops Endorsement)

1.1 This guide establishes the minimum training requirements, including general and field knowledge, skills, and abilities, for personnel who operate ATVs or ROHVs as part of their duties.

1.2 This guide applies only to ATVs and ROHVs as defined below.

1.3 An ATV-ROHV Ops Endorsement alone is not sufficient to indicate that an individual has the knowledge, skills, or abilities to perform any specific duties, including search and rescue operations, other than those defined within this guide.

1.4 ATV-ROHV Ops Endorsed individuals may, under qualified supervision, perform their normal duties safely and effectively on ATVs or ROHVs.

1.5 ATV-ROHV Ops Endorsed individuals operate on the surface of the land only, including urban or disaster areas that may be isolated or have lost supporting infrastructure.

1.6 This guide alone does not provide the minimum training requirements for SAR personnel to operate ATVs or ROHVs while in partially or fully collapsed structures, in- or on-water, in confined spaces, underground (such as in caves, mines, and tunnels), or in a mountain or alpine environment.

1.7 Human land SAR resources that may utilize personnel trained to this guide are classified in Classification F1993.

1.7.1 Further training may be required before ATV-ROHV OPS Endorsed personnel may participate on a particular Category or Kind of SAR resource, depending on local needs, regulations, or policies of the authority having jurisdiction.

1.8 Personnel trained only to this guide are not qualified to perform search or rescue. No training in land search, patient evacuation, rope use, or other rescue skills is included in this guide.

1.8.1 Basic search skills and knowledge are found in Guide F2209.

1.8.2 Basic rescue skills and knowledge are found in Guide F2751.

1.9 Personnel trained only to this guide are not qualified to operate in leadership positions.

1.10 ATV-ROHV Ops Endorsed personnel must work under qualified supervision, as deemed appropriate by the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

1.11 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ASTM D3951-18

Standard Practice for Commercial Packaging

1.1 This practice establishes minimum requirements for packaging of supplies and equipment, exclusive of ammunition, explosives, or hazardous materials, as covered in Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety, health, and environmental practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

1.4 This international standard was developed in accordance with internationally recognized principles on standardization established in the Decision on Principles for the Development of International Standards, Guides and Recommendations issued by the World Trade Organization Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee.


ASTM B117-19

Standard Practice for Operating Salt Spray (Fog) Apparatus

1.1 This practice covers the apparatus, procedure, and conditions required to create and maintain the salt spray (fog) test environment. Suitable apparatus which may be used is described in Appendix X1 . 1.2 This practice does not prescribe the type of test specimen or exposure periods to be used for a specific product, nor the interpretation to be given to the results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses after SI units are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety, health, and environmental practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.5 This international standard was developed in accordance with internationally recognized principles on standardization established in the Decision on Principles for the Development of International Standards, Guides and Recommendations issued by the World Trade Organization Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee.


ASTM E2659-18

Standard Practice for Certificate Programs

1.1 This practice provides guidance to certificate issuers for developing and administering quality certificate programs and to stakeholders for determining the quality of certificate programs. 1.2 This practice includes requirements for both the entity issuing the certificate and requirements for the specific certificate programs for which it issues certificates. 1.3 This practice provides the foundation for the recognition or accreditation, or both, of a specific entity to issue a specific certificate or certificates to individuals after successful completion of a certificate program. 1.4 This practice does not address guidance pertaining to certification of individuals nor does it address guidance pertaining to education or training programs in general, including those that issue certificates of participation or certificates of attendance. 1.5 This international standard was developed in accordance with internationally recognized principles on standardization established in the Decision on Principles for the Development of International Standards, Guides and Recommendations issued by the World Trade Organization Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee.


ASTM A380/A380M-17

Standard Practice for Cleaning, Descaling, and Passivation of Stainless Steel Parts, Equipment, and Systems

1.1 This practice covers recommendations and precautions for cleaning, descaling, and passivating of new stainless steel parts, assemblies, equipment, and installed systems. These recommendations are presented as procedures for guidance when it is recognized that for a particular service it is desired to remove surface contaminants that may impair the normal corrosion resistance, or result in the later contamination of the particular stainless steel grade, or cause product contamination. The selection of procedures from this practice to be applied to the parts may be specified upon agreement between the supplier and the purchaser. For certain exceptional applications, additional requirements which are not covered by this practice may be specified upon agreement between the supplier and the purchaser. Although they apply primarily to materials in the composition ranges of the austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and duplex stainless steels, the practices described may also be useful for cleaning other metals if due consideration is given to corrosion and possible metallurgical effects.

1.1.1 The term passivation is commonly applied to several distinctly different operations or processes relating to stainless steels. In order to avoid ambiguity in the setting of requirements, it may be necessary for the purchaser to define precisely the intended meaning of passivation. Some of the various meanings associated with the term passivation that are in common usage include the following:

1.1.1.1 Passivation is the process by which a stainless steel will spontaneously form a chemically resistant surface when exposed to air or other oxygen-containing environments. It was at one time considered that an oxidizing treatment was necessary to establish this passive metal oxide film, but it is now accepted that this film will form spontaneously in an oxygen-containing environment providing that the surface has been thoroughly cleaned or descaled.

1.1.1.2 Passivation is removal of exogenous iron or iron compounds from the surface of a stainless steel by means of a chemical dissolution, most typically by a treatment with an acid solution that will remove the surface contamination but will not significantly affect the stainless steel itself. This process is described in a general way in 6.2.11 and defined precisely in 6.4 with further reference to the requirements of Annex A2 and Part II of the table on acid cleaning of steel. Unless otherwise specified, it is this definition of passivation that is taken as the meaning of a specified requirement for passivation. (See also Specification A967/A967M.)

1.1.1.3 Passivation is the chemical treatment of a stainless steel with a mild oxidant, such as a nitric acid solution, for the purpose of enhancing the spontaneous formation of the protective passive metal oxide film. Such chemical treatment is generally not necessary for the formation of the passive metal oxide film.

1.1.1.4 Passivation does not indicate the separate process of descaling as described in Section 5, although descaling may be necessary before passivation can be effective. Depending on the application, chemical descaling (acid pickling) as described in 5.2.1 may provide sufficient passivation as defined in 1.1.1.2.

1.2 This practice does not cover decontamination or cleaning of equipment or systems that have been in service, nor does it cover descaling and cleaning of materials at the mill. On the other hand, some of the practices may be applicable for these purposes. While the practice provides recommendations and information concerning the use of acids and other cleaning and descaling agents, it cannot encompass detailed cleaning procedures for specific types of equipment or installations. It therefore in no way precludes the necessity for careful planning and judgment in the selection and implementation of such procedures.

1.3 These practices may be applied when free iron, oxide scale, rust, grease, oil, carbonaceous or other residual chemical films, soil, particles, metal chips, dirt, or other nonvolatile deposits might adversely affect the metallurgical or sanitary condition or stability of a surface, the mechanical operation of a part, component, or system, or contaminate a process fluid. The degree of cleanness required on a surface depends on the application. In some cases, no more than degreasing or removal of gross contamination is necessary. Others, such as food-handling, pharmaceutical, aerospace, and certain nuclear applications, may require extremely high levels of cleanness, including removal of all detectable residual chemical films and contaminants that are invisible to ordinary inspection methods.

Note 1: The term “iron,” when hereinafter referred to as a surface contaminant, shall denote free iron.

1.4 Attainment of surfaces that are free of iron, metallic deposits, and other contamination depends on a combination of proper design, fabrication methods, cleaning and descaling, and protection to prevent recontamination of cleaned surfaces. Meaningful tests to establish the degree of cleanness of a surface are few, and those are often difficult to administer and to evaluate objectively. Visual inspection is suitable for the detection of gross contamination, scale, rust, and particulates, but may not reveal the presence of thin films of oil or residual chemical films. In addition, visual inspection of internal surfaces is often impossible because of the configuration of the item. Methods are described for the detection of free iron and transparent chemical and oily deposits.

1.5 This practice provides definitions and describes practices for cleaning, descaling, and passivation of stainless steel parts. Tests with acceptance criteria to demonstrate that the passivation procedures have been successful are listed in 7.2.5 and 7.3.4, and can also be found in Specification A967/A967M.

1.6 The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in non-conformance with the standard.

1.7 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (For more specific safety precautions see 7.2.5.3, 7.3.4, Section 8, A1.7, and A2.11.)

1.8 This international standard was developed in accordance with internationally recognized principles on standardization established in the Decision on Principles for the Development of International Standards, Guides and Recommendations issued by the World Trade Organization Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee.


ASTM F1637-21

Standard Practice for Safe Walking Surfaces

1.1 Â This practice covers design and construction guidelines and minimum maintenance criteria for new and existing buildings and structures. This practice is intended to provide reasonably safe walking surfaces for pedestrians wearing ordinary footwear. These guidelines may not be adequate for those with certain mobility impairments. 1.2 Â Conformance with this practice will not alleviate all hazards; however, conformance will reduce certain pedestrian risks. 1.3 Â The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.4 Â This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety, health, and environmental practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.5 Â This international standard was developed in accordance with internationally recognized principles on standardization established in the Decision on Principles for the Development of International Standards, Guides and Recommendations issued by the World Trade Organization Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee.


ASTM F88/F88M-15

Standard Test Method for Seal Strength of Flexible Barrier Materials

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of the strength of seals in flexible barrier materials.

1.2 The test may be conducted on seals between a flexible material and a rigid material.

1.3 Seals tested in accordance with this test method may be from any source, laboratory or commercial.

1.4 This test method measures the force required to separate a test strip of material containing the seal. It also identifies the mode of specimen failure.

1.5 The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in non-conformance with the standard.

1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


ANSI Logo

As the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) empowers its members and constituents to strengthen the U.S. marketplace position in the global economy while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

CUSTOMER SERVICE
NEW YORK OFFICE
ANSI HEADQUARTERS