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ASA: Acoustical Society of America

ASA, the Acoustical Society of America, is a nonprofit organization that develops and publishes standards on acoustics, mechanical shock, noise and other associated subjects. Headquartered near New York City, United States, ASA is composed of nearly 7,000 members and is a founding member of the American Institute of Physics. ASA also serves as the administrator for the U.S. TAGs (United States Technical Advisory Group) to ISO/TCs 43 and 108 (International Organization for Standardization/Technical Committee) and to various subcommittees within each. Standards from ASA are available both individually, directly through the ANSI webstore, and as part of a Standards Subscription. If you or your organization are interested in easy, managed, online access to standards that can be shared, a Standards Subscription may be what you need - please contact us at: StandardsSubscriptions@ansi.org or 1-212-642-4980 or Request Proposal Price.

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ANSI/ASA S12.6-2016

Methods for Measuring the Real-Ear Attenuation of Hearing Protectors

This standard specifies laboratory-based procedures for measuring, analyzing, and reporting the passive noise-reducing capabilities of hearing protectors.


ANSI/ASA S1.4-2014/Part 1 / IEC 61672:1-2013

American National Standard Electroacoustics - Sound Level Meters - Part 1: Specifications (a nationally adopted international standard)

This part of ANSI/ASA S1.4 / IEC 61672 gives electroacoustical performance specifications for three kinds of sound-measuring instruments: a time-weighting sound level meter that measures exponentialtime- weighted, frequency-weighted sound levels; an integrating-averaging sound level meter that measures time-averaged, frequency-weighted sound levels; and an integrating sound level meter that measures frequency-weighted sound exposure levels


ANSI/ASA S3.6-2010

Specification for Audiometers

Audiometers are electronic instruments intended for the testing of human hearing. This standard includes specifications and tolerances for audiometers and standard reference threshold levels for audiometric transducers such as supra-aural, circumaural, and insert earphones; bone vibrators; and loudspeakers.


ANSI/ASA S12.60-2010/Part 1 (R2015)

Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools, Part 1: Permanent Schools

Part 1 of ANSI/ASA S12.60 is applicable to core learning spaces and classrooms with interior volumes not exceeding 566 m3 (20 000 ft3) and to ancillary learning spaces of any volume. Learning spaces with volumes larger than 566 m3 (20 000 ft3) are considered ancillary learning spaces for purposes of this standard.


ANSI/ASA S12.2-2008

Criteria for Evaluating Room Noise

This Standard provides three primary methods for evaluating room noise: a survey method, an engineering method, and a method for evaluating low-frequency fluctuating noise. Two methods forevaluating room noise-RC (room criterion) and NCB (balanced noise criterion) curves-were the basis of the previous ANSI S12.2-1995 standard, and RC is included briefly for informational purposes in Annex D. All of the methods assume that the measured noise is free of tones.


ANSI/ASA S3.2-2009 (R2014)

Method for Measuring the Intelligibility of Speech over Communication Systems

The scope of this standard includes the measurement of the intelligibility of speech over entire communication systems and the evaluation of the contributions of elements of speech communication systems. The scope also includes evaluation of the factors that affect the intelligibility of speech.


ANSI/ASA S12.42-2010

Methods for the Measurement of Insertion Loss of Hearing Protection Devices in Continuous or Impulsive Noise Using Microphone-in-Real-Ear or Acoustic Test Fixture Procedures

This standard provides methods for the measurement of the insertion loss of hearing protectiondevices in specified continuous and impulsive noise environments. The microphone-in-real-ear(MIRE) method utilizes human test subjects and may be used for hearing protectors that enclose theears and make supra-aural or circumaural contact with the head, whereas the acoustical test fixture(ATF) method employs an inanimate fixture and can be used for any hearing protection device. Thestandard contains information on instrumentation, calibration, and electroacoustic requirementsincluding details regarding the sound field of test facilities, the acoustical characteristics of ATFs, andsubject selection and training and location of ear-mounted microphones for MIRE testing. Methods formeasuring or determining sound pressure levels in the ear are also specified as well as methods forreporting the calculated insertion loss.


ANSI/ASA S3.22-2014

Specification of Hearing Aid Characteristics

This standard describes hearing aid measurements that are particularly suitable for specification and tolerance purposes.


ANSI/ASA S3.5-1997 (R2017)

Methods for Calculation of the Speech Intelligibility Index

Defines a method for computing a physical measure that is highly correlated with the intelligibility of speech as evaluated by speech perception tests given a group of talkers and listeners. This measure is called the speech Intelligibility Index, SII. The SII is calculated from acoustical measurements of speech and noise.


ANSI/ASA S2.71-1983 (R2012)

Guide to the Evaluation of Human Exposure to Vibration in Buildings

Assesses the reactions of humans to vibrations of 1 to 80 Hz inside buildings by use of degrees of perception and associated vibration levels and durations. Accelerations or velocities inside buildings may be measured to assess perceptibility and possible adverse reactions from those inside. A variety of building types and situations are covered by the use of multiplying factors applied to the basic curves. Responses are related to the event durations, frequencies of vibration, and body orientation with respect to the vibration. Adherence to the vibration magnitudes corresponding to the perceptibility threshold ensures minimum discomfort and annoyance.


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As the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) empowers its members and constituents to strengthen the U.S. marketplace position in the global economy while helping to assure the safety and health of consumers and the protection of the environment.

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