Clothing

Clothing particle testing standards are published by ISO. They cover protective clothing for protection against chemicals and infectious agents, test methods for determination of resistance to penetration by liquid spray test, and determination of contact heat transmission through protective clothing or constituent materials.

ISO 16602:2007

Protective clothing for protection against chemicals - Classification, labelling and performance requirements

ISO 16602:2007 establishes minimum performance classification and labelling requirements for protective clothing designed to provide protection against chemicals. Protective clothing items covered by ISO 16602:2007 include, but may not be limited to, totally encapsulating suits, liquid-tight or spray-tight suits, coveralls, jackets, trousers, aprons, smocks, hoods, sleeves, and shoe and boot covers. Chemical protective clothing for protection against airborne particles is addressed by ISO 13982-1, which is referenced in ISO 16602:2007. ISO 16602:2007 does not address protection against solid chemicals in forms other than airborne solid particulates (e.g. it does not address the challenge of penetration of chemical dust and powders through materials and clothing by rubbing or flexing or by simple direct contact of dust or powders onto the clothing surface). ISO 16602:2007 does not address gloves, boots, eye/face protection devices and respiratory protective devices unless they are an integral part of the protective clothing. ISO 16602:2007 does not address protection against biological or thermal (hot or cold) hazards, ionizing radiation, or radioactive contamination. ISO 16602:2007 also does not address the specialized clothing used in hazardous chemical emergencies. ISO 16602:2007 is intended to provide chemical protective clothing manufacturers with minimum requirements for testing, classifying, and labelling chemical protective clothing. To assist the users of products covered under ISO 16602:2007, this document provides descriptions of referenced test methods, guidelines for conducting hazard and risk assessments and suggested performance levels for certain applications. It is not the intent of ISO 16602:2007 to address all situations.

ISO 22612:2005

Clothing for protection against infectious agents - Test method for resistance to dry microbial penetration

ISO 22612:2005 specifies a test method for assessing the resistance to penetration through barrier materials of bacteria-carrying particles. Due to its complexity, this ISO 22612:2005 cannot be considered as a useful method for routine quality control but may suit the needs when a material is assessed for compliance with the requirements of current regulations such as EU Directive 93/42/EEC.

ISO 17491-4:2008

Protective clothing - Test methods for clothing providing protection against chemicals - Part 4: Determination of resistance to penetration by a spray of liquid (spray test)

ISO 17491-4:2008 specifies methods for determining the resistance of chemical protective clothing to penetration by sprays of liquid chemicals at two different levels of intensity: Method A: low-level spray test. This is applicable to clothing that covers the full body surface and which is intended to be worn when there is a potential risk of exposure to small quantities of spray or accidental low volume splashes of a liquid chemical. Method B: high level spray test This is applicable to clothing with spray-tight connections between different parts of the clothing and, if applicable, between the clothing and other items of personal protective equipment, which covers the full body surface and which is intended to be worn when there is a risk of exposure to sprayed particles of liquid.

ISO 12127-2:2007

Clothing for protection against heat and flame - Determination of contact heat transmission through protective clothing or constituent materials - Part 2: Test method using contact heat produced by dropping small cylinders

ISO 12127-2:2007 specifies a test method designed to evaluate the heat transfer and the behaviour of materials used for protective clothing when such materials are struck by high temperature metal particles, especially when these are trapped in the folds of the garment in working situations. The results obtained by this method permit the comparison of the behaviour of different materials which have undergone this test under standardized conditions. They do not permit conclusions to be drawn with respect to contacts with large splashes of molten cast iron or other metal, nor do they allow the behaviour of complete garments under industrial conditions to be predicted.